Scroll to top

Tag: South Sudan

Daily Beast Op-ed: Corrupt Leaders Thrust South Sudan Into Famine and Abject Ruin

A legacy of corruption and violence has finally caught up to South Sudan, the world’s newest country, as the United Nations has declared a full-blown famine, a rare designation not made for any part of the world since 2011. Multiple UN officials have additionally warned that the country, riven by armed conflict, stands on the brink of genocide.

By Enough Team

March 22, 2017

Despite Assurances, South Sudanese Government Continues to Impede Aid Efforts

Last month, the United Nations declared famine in parts of South Sudan with 100,000 people currently facing starvation and a further one million on the brink of famine. Despite such alarming reports, South Sudan’s government has put up roadblocks impeding international humanitarian aid efforts trying to reach those severely affected by the crisis. A recent report by the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs stated that “Aid workers continue to face multiple obstacles to the delivery of humanitarian assistance across South Sudan, including active hostilities, access denials, and bureaucratic impediments.”

By Megha Swamy

March 13, 2017

Washington Post Op-ed: South Sudan’s Government-made Famine

Official, U.N.-declared famines are a rare phenomenon. The last one worldwide was six years ago, in Somalia. Famines are declared officially when people have already begun to starve to death. It is the diplomatic equivalent of a seven-alarm fire. That is where the youngest country in the world, South Sudan, finds itself today, as 100,000 face immediate starvation and another 1 million are on its brink.

By Enough Team

March 9, 2017

Corruption Continues to Blight Several African Countries

Transparency International recently released the results of its 2016 Corruptions Perceptions Index, a survey of perceived levels of corruption in the public sectors of 176 countries and territories. “No country,” Transparency International immediately observes, “gets close to a perfect score.” In fact, corruption perceptions grew worse, not better, for most countries in 2016. 

By Megha Swamy

February 22, 2017

Missing the Point on South Sudan

On January 18, Ambassador Donald Booth took the stage at the United States Institute of Peace to reflect on his tenure as U.S. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan. During this discussion, Booth’s mention of the missed opportunities for meaningful action early in South Sudan’s civil war was noticeably absent. While lamenting miscalculations regarding the selfish ways of the country’s political leaders and wondering how the new administration could “incentivize” peace, he failed to reflect on what might have been the administration’s most consequential decision . . . or lack thereof.

By Ian Schwab

February 6, 2017

Kenya Must Release Aggrey Idri and Dong Samuel

On January 24, in a worrying move, Kenyan authorities detained two South Sudanese activists, Aggrey Idri and Dong Samuel in Nairobi. They are affiliated with South Sudan’s political opposition and are currently at risk of being deported to Juba.

By Enough Team

January 26, 2017

New Report - Weapons of Mass Corruption: How Corruption in South Sudan’s Military Undermines the World’s Newest Country

Today, the Enough Project released a new report, Weapons of Mass Corruption: How corruption in South Sudan’s military undermines the world’s newest country. This fifth installment of the Political Economy of African Wars Series describes the system of corruption within the South Sudanese army, showing how it is part of the larger system of violent kleptocracy in South Sudan which perpetuates conflict and the commission of atrocity crimes against civilians.

By Enough Team

January 26, 2017

Weapons of Mass Corruption: How corruption in South Sudan’s military undermines the world’s newest country

“Weapons of Mass Corruption” is the fifth in a series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

By Enough Team

January 26, 2017

New Report Exposes Massive Corruption in South Sudan’s Army

A new report, “Weapons of Mass Corruption: How corruption in South Sudan’s military undermines the world’s newest country,” published today by the Enough Project, details massive corruption within South Sudan’s army. Corrupt activities within the army detailed in the report include procurement fraud, irregular spending unchecked by civilian authority, and bloated troop rosters featuring thousands of “ghost” (non-existent) soldiers.

By Enough Team

January 26, 2017

Watch The Good Lie This Semester

As students left for holiday break, the United Nations warned of a looming genocide in South Sudan. Communities can come together to build interest in South Sudan and lay the groundwork for future action. Hosting a film screening is something every community leader can do. As the semester gets into full swing, one film to add to the roster is The Good Lie.

By Marissa Sandgren

January 24, 2017

The Economist Op-ed: Stop the Cash, Stop the Conflict

The world’s newest country, South Sudan, could have been holding its first free elections in 2017. Instead, it faces another year of strife. In the latest phase of the cyclical conflict that has plagued its people for decades, tens of thousands have died, 5m people face hunger or starvation and 1m have become refugees. Yet cleverer global action—especially involving Western banks—can stop the rot.

By Enough Team

November 21, 2016