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Tag: D.R. Congo

Portland Goes Conflict-Free

Activists and policymakers are celebrating the Portland City Council’s vote today to enact a policy to ensure that cellular devices and other key communication equipment purchased by the city are not connected to killing, child abductions, or sexual violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

By Enough Team

August 26, 2015

Over 140 Mines in Congo are Now Officially Conflict-Free: the Latest List

Over the past three years, teams of business persons, government officials, and civil society members have been traveling to mines in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo to assess whether or not the mines are conflict-free. Out of a total 180 mines assessed so far, 141 have now been validated as conflict-free.

By Sasha Lezhnev

August 17, 2015

STUDENTS - APPLY NOW! Campus Organizer, Enough Project's Conflict-Free Campus Initiative

The Enough Project’s Conflict-Free Campus Initiative (CFCI) draws on the power of student leadership to support peace efforts in the Democratic Republic of Congo (Congo). CFCI students lead targeted activism campaigns aimed at addressing key impediments to peace, including the deadly conflict mineral trade. As a Campus Organizer for CFCI, you will be an essential part of strengthening the conflict-free movement on your campus. APPLY NOW!

By Annie Callaway

June 22, 2015

Companies Mark Major Benchmark, Support a Conflict-Free Minerals Trade in Congo

Today marks the deadline for publicly traded companies in the United States to disclose the potential presence of conflict minerals in their supply chains, and what they’re doing about it. While many positive trends are emerging, implementation of Dodd-Frank 1502 is still in its nascent stages and there are many improvements still to be made. As Nobel Peace Prize Nominee and Sakahrov Prize Winner Dr. Denis Mukwege stated: "A conflict-free minerals industry would contribute to ending the unspeakable violence the people of Congo have endured for years."

By Annie Callaway

June 1, 2015

Brandeis University Goes Conflict-Free

May 21, 2015 - Student activists are celebrating the announcement from Brandeis University of a new policy to ensure computers and other electronic equipment they purchase are not connected to killing, child abductions, and sexual violence in the mining sector of the Democratic Republic of the Congo.

By Enough Team

May 21, 2015

NGOs, Congo Experts Identify Tom Perriello as Top-Choice Candidate for U.S. Congo Envoy Position

Russ Feingold was the highest-level U.S. envoy ever deployed to the Democratic Republic of Congo and the Great Lakes Region of Africa. Today, two months after Feingold’s resignation to run for Senate, the pressure is mounting on Secretary of State John Kerry to appoint a new, high-level Special Envoy.NGOs, Members of Congress, and Congo experts are all weighing in on the conversation. The United States must swiftly appoint a new envoy whose credentials and position within the State Department’s hierarchy mirror those of Feingold. A name has emerged as a frontrunner in the Congo coalition community: former Congressman Tom Perriello. 

By Annie Callaway

May 19, 2015

My Story: From Congo to the NFL

Green Bay Packers linebacker and Enough Project upstander Andy Mulumba writes about why he supports the Raise Hope for Congo campaign.

By Enough Team

May 11, 2015

Happy Mother’s Day, Mama Koko

Celebrate Mama Koko and other heroic mothers by sharing excerpts from her story with your friends, and pledging to join us in our work to end genocide and mass atrocities.

By Travis Roberts

May 7, 2015

My Night with Robin Wright

In April 2015, CFCI Campus Organizer Corey Jones had the opportunity to attend an event at the University of Florida with actor and activist Robin Wright. In this post Corey reflects on the evening, the power of influence, and his work advocating for peace in Congo.

By Enough Team

May 4, 2015

Activist Brief: Congo's Conflict Gold Rush

While significant progress has been made towards creating a conflict-free minerals trade in eastern Democratic Republic of Congo, gold continues to fund armed commanders. Thanks to on the ground initiatives in Congo, international activist and industry pressure, and federal legislation in the United States, 70 percent of the 3T mines (tin, tantalum, and tungsten) are now free of armed groups and Congo’s army, according to the International Peace Information Service. However, only 35 percent of gold mines in eastern Congo are conflict-free, with abusive Congolese army commanders and armed groups still profiting from the trade.

By Enough Team

May 1, 2015

New Congo Report: Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush and How to Counter it

A trade in illegally mined and smuggled “conflict gold” is fueling both high-level military corruption and violent rebel groups in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to a new report by the Enough Project. “Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush: Bringing gold into the legal trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo,” by the Enough Project’s Fidel Bafilemba and Sasha Lezhnev, offers an in-depth portrait of the conflict gold supply chain, from muddy artisanal mines where gold is dug out with shovels and pick-axes, through illicit transport routes in Uganda, Burundi, and Dubai. Based on seven months of field research at mines and in regional capitals, the report provides an in-depth discussion of solutions to the conflict gold supply chain. The U.S. government, European Union, jewelers, socially responsible investors, the World Bank, and activists all have important roles to play.

By Enough Team

April 30, 2015

Congo's Conflict Gold Rush: Bringing Gold into the Legal Trade in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

A trade in illegally mined and smuggled “conflict gold” is fueling both high-level military corruption and violent rebel groups in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to a new report by the Enough Project. “Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush: Bringing gold into the legal trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo,” by the Enough Project’s Fidel Bafilemba and Sasha Lezhnev, offers an in-depth portrait of the conflict gold supply chain, from muddy artisanal mines where gold is dug out with shovels and pick-axes, through illicit transport routes in Uganda, Burundi, and Dubai. Based on seven months of field research at mines and in regional capitals, the report provides an in-depth discussion of solutions to the conflict gold supply chain.

By Fidel Bafilemba

April 21, 2015