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Tag: Violent Kleptocracy

A Nobel Laureate, an Indicted War Criminal, and What They Have in Common

The international community has bestowed very different labels on Aung San Suu Kyi and Omar al-Bashir: Burma’s de facto leader is a Nobel Laureate, while Sudan’s head of state is an indictee of the International Criminal Court. Today, however, as they both face worldwide condemnation, the United States is on the dangerous path to lose leverage to influence either.

By Brad Brooks-Rubin

October 23, 2017

New Report: Breaking Out of the Spiral in South Sudan

In this report, authors Brian Adeba, Brad Brooks-Rubin, John Prendergast, and Jon Temin argue that the metastasizing crisis in South Sudan urgently requires a new strategy for achieving a sustainable peace.

By Enough Team

September 28, 2017

“Yes, We Have Leverage”: U.S. and International Community Have Tools at Hand to Stop Violent Kleptocrats

  Enough Project policy report details “playbook” of tools available to policymakers to address corrupt elites, intractable conflicts in Africa A policy report published today by the Enough Project details how the international community, and in particular the United States, can exert powerful leverage to impact the calculations, behavior, and material position of violent kleptocratic […]

By Enough Team

June 15, 2017

U.S. Tools to Bankrupt Kleptocracy: The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA)

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) was passed in 1977 and prohibits U.S. persons from bribing foreign officials. The law was developed after an investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission found that in order to secure business opportunities overseas, over 400 U.S. companies had paid hundreds of millions of dollars in bribes to foreign officials. The same investigation found that these firms were using “secret slush funds” and falsifying corporate records to disguise illicit payments to foreign officials (as well as illegal campaign contributions to U.S. politicians).

By Enough Team

October 11, 2016

U.S. Tools to Bankrupt Kleptocracy: Anti-Money Laundering and Asset Seizure

Corruption and money laundering go hand in hand. Money laundering is the effort to legitimize wealth obtained through the commission of a crime, often known as a “predicate offense.” Fraud, theft, bribery, and other acts associated with corruption are considered to be predicate offenses in most jurisdictions. A wide range of anti-money laundering provisions have come into force over the past century that can be used to combat corruption. However, numerous loopholes that remain in place allow ill-gotten gains to enter the United States with ease and prevent efforts aimed at tracing and seizing the proceeds of corruption.

By Enough Team

October 11, 2016

U.S. Tools to Bankrupt Kleptocracy: Targeted and Sophisticated Sanctions Programs

Sanctions are well-suited to countering violent kleptocracies because of their ability to impact the target regime’s wealth. Sanctions can alter kleptocrats’ problematic incentive structures, which favor continued conflict over peace due to the prospect of financial gain from war. To be most effective, however, sanctions must be strategic in both design and implementation.

By Enough Team

October 11, 2016