Human Rights

Starving War, Feeding Peace, and Setting the Table for National Dialogue in Sudan

There is no doubt that some form of a national dialogue will be a key ingredient to a comprehensive peace in Sudan.  But, to have a transformative effect on governance, that process needs to be meaningful, genuine, and inclusive. Despite hopeful signals in September 2014, Sudan’s nascent national dialogue process is currently none of those things. As it stands right now, the dialogue’s format remains imbalanced, exclusive and restrictive.  Beyond problems with the structure of the process, the Sudanese government’s actions outside of the dialogue forum have further undermined prospects for genuine discourse about the way forward.  But, this could change, if the Sudanese government decides to engage meaningfully and demonstrates its commitment by fulfilling six preconditions, including an alternate neutral administration for the dialogue. International stakeholders now have an opportunity to help to rebalance power dynamics and revitalize the much-needed but deeply compromised process.

Extermination By Design: The Case for Crimes Against Humanity In Sudan's Nuba Mountains

Our policy analyst Akshaya Kumar argues that the desperate situation of the people in rebel-controlled areas, the Sudanese government’s aid blockade, and indiscriminate attacks on civilians, along with statements recently attributed to senior commanders in the government forces, lay the foundation for a case of crimes against humanity by extermination.

CNN Op-Ed: At the UN, Janjaweed is a Dirty Word

Ten years ago this week, then-Secretary of State Colin Powell declared that genocide had been committed in Darfur and that the government of Sudan and the janjaweed bore responsibility for those acts. Even though it did not actually trigger a legal obligation to act, many hoped that using the "g word" meant that the United States was crossing the Rubicon and committing itself to stopping the violence in Darfur, Sudan's most troubled region. The janjaweed, however, are still at large in Darfur -- and with the Sudanese government's help, they are now arguably more powerful than ever.  Read More »

Interview with Justine Fleischner: A View from War-Ravaged South Sudan

South Sudan’s civil war began in December 2013 as a political power struggle, but quickly led to ethnic-targeted killings and revenge attacks. Thousands have been killed, although no one knows the exact number, and the country now faces what could become the most deadly famine in Africa since the 1990s. The Enough Project’s Justine Fleischner recently returned from a month-long trip to South Sudan and Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, where the regionally mediated peace process is underway. As part of Enough’s new interview series, Fleischner spoke with Greg Hittelman about what she saw.  Read More »

Spreading News by Boda Boda: An Innovative Approach to Meeting the Needs of Internally Displaced Persons in Juba, South Sudan

Approximately 94,000 people are displaced and sheltering in U.N. bases throughout South Sudan as a result of ongoing conflict. In the midst of dire conditions and grave humanitarian needs, the agencies at one Protection of Civilians site in Tong Ping, Juba have found a simple yet highly effective approach to meeting the information needs of internally displaced persons– broadcasting news from roving “boda boda” motorbikes.  Read More »

A Doctor's View from a Foxhole in Sudan

The aftermath of the bombing, Photo by author

I'm a doctor, not a writer. But the situation I witnessed while volunteering in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan compels me to write and tell the story of what is happening there. Since 2011, the only hospital in the entire Nuba Mountains region, Mother of Mercy in Gidel, had been spared bombardment – until last month.   Read More »

Brazen Assault Caught on Camera As Security Council Debates Darfur Peacekeeping Mission

UN Photo/Albert González Farran

New photographs smuggled out of Darfur show uniformed Sudanese security forces brazenly assaulting Darfuris living in El Salam camp for the internally displaced. The camp, on the outskirts of Nyala in South Darfur, is host to tens of thousands who fled their homes due to violence. The recent assault was carried out last week under the pretense of a disarmament campaign. However, Abu Sharati, spokesman for the camp residents' association argues "the main objective of this attack is terrorising the camp population and dismantling the camp."  Read More »

Think Progress Op-Ed:The Way to Bring A Lasting Peace In The Congo? Women.

When Nobel Peace Prize winner Leymah Gbowee led women in song at the fish markets on the Liberian coast in the late 1990s, she began one of the most striking peace movements of our time. Amidst brutal civil war, Gbowee mobilized women across diverse religious and political affiliations to demand inclusion in their country’s peace process. As they advanced from church basements to picket lines to presidential palaces, little did Gbowee know she would inspire women over a decade later, almost three thousand miles away in the war-ravaged eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of Congo.  Read More »

As Mariam Walks Free, Omer Ismail Highlights Broader Injustices Perpetrated by Sudan Government

On July 24, after a lengthy ordeal, Mariam Ibrahim was released into the custody of Italy’s deputy foreign minister. Ms. Ibrahim was sentenced to death by hanging by a Sudanese court on charges of apostasy – converting from Islam to Christianity – and this verdict roused global condemnation. The case serves as a stark example of the violence that continues to be perpetrated by the government of Sudan against millions of Sudanese citizens.  Read More »

Peace in CAR and beyond: a role for civil society

With a ceasefire recently signed in Brazzaville and a new U.N. mission preparing to deploy to the Central African Republic (CAR), civil society groups are seeking ways to promote local reconciliation processes and a role in encouraging peace more broadly across CAR. Understanding the different means by which civil society groups have been involved in promoting peace in other contexts can lend insight on civil society’s role in developing sustainable peace in CAR.  Read More »

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