Reports

  • Enough Team, Aug 26, 2015

    The Enough Project welcomes the decision by the Government of South Sudan and President Salva Kiir to sign the compromise peace agreement, adding his signature to that of armed opposition leader Dr. Riek Machar and other stakeholders, to hopefully bring their country’s brutal civil war to an end.

    Read the full statement below.

  • Enough Team, Aug 25, 2015

    On August 25, the Enough Project released a public statement addressing U.S. Special Envoy for Sudan and South Sudan Donald Booth’s diplomatic visit to Sudan. Ambassador Booth should use this trip to enhance U.S. policy on Sudan by creating the financial pressure necessary to target the individuals and entities that benefit from pervasive corruption and ongoing conflict in Sudan.

  • Enough Team, Aug 12, 2015
    Beyond Deadlock

    South Sudan’s warring factions have one last chance to end their country’s 20-month civil war and sign a compromise agreement proposed by the Intergovernmental Authority on Development (IGAD) mediators, who are leading negotiations. The U.S. government has promised serious consequences if the parties fail to meet the August 17 deadline set by the international community. During his recent visit to East Africa, President Obama convened a roundtable on South Sudan with the presidents of Kenya and Uganda, Ethiopia’s prime minister, Sudan’s foreign minister, and the African Union Commission’s chairperson to build consensus on the need to collectively pressure South Sudan’s warring parties toward peace. In no uncertain terms, President Obama warned that the United States is prepared to move forward with additional available tools to apply greater pressure on the parties. When speaking to the African Union, he said that if the two sides miss the deadline, “the international community must raise the costs of intransigence.” At a press conference in the region with Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn, President Obama explained, “we also think that [the United States] can be a mechanism for additional leverage on the parties, who, up until this point, have proven very stubborn and have not yet risen to the point where they are looking out for the interests of their nation as opposed to their particular self-interests. And that transition has to take place, and it has to take place now.”

  • Akshaya Kumar and John Prendergast, Jul 23, 2015

    President Obama’s upcoming trip to Ethiopia and Kenya offers an opportunity to reorient U.S. government policies to move beyond threats and focus on a much more robust strategy of disrupting and ultimately dismantling this system, which is funding, fueling, and profiting from the conflict in South Sudan.

  • Enough Team, Jul 22, 2015
    POTUS in Africa

    The international community needs a fresh strategy for addressing the deadly nexus between conflict and corruption, and President Barack Obama’s upcoming travel to Kenya and Ethiopia offers a unique opportunity to set the tone for prioritizing new policy approaches to conflicts that had once seemed intractable.

  • Enough Project and undersigned, Jul 22, 2015

    The Enough Project joined a diverse community of 19 advocacy, faith and human rights organizations issuing an open letter to President Obama as he embarks upon his historic trip to Kenya and Ethiopia. The letter urges the President to take a number of specific steps to help combat the culture of impunity to forge an enabling environment for peace negotiations.

  • Akshaya Kumar, Jul 10, 2015

    Testimony of Akshaya Kumar, Enough Project Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst, before the United States Congress Tom Lantos Human Rights Commission hearing on “The Current Human Rights Situation in South Sudan,” given on July 10, 2015.

  • Kasper Agger, Jun 17, 2015
    Warlord Business

    Political Economy of African Wars Series

    “Warlord Business” is the second in a new series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

  • Enough Team, Jun 10, 2015
    Neighborhood Watch

    Political Economy of African Wars Series

    "Neighborhood Watch: Mobilizing Regional Action for Peace in South Sudan" is the first in the Enough Project's new series of in-depth, field research-driven reports on the dynamics of profit and power fueling war in the Horn, East and Central Africa. Violent kleptocracies dominate the political landscape of this region, leading to protracted conflicts marked by the commission of mass atrocities by state and non-state actors. Enough's Political Economy of African Wars series will focus on the key players in these conflicts, their motivations, how they benefit from the evolving war economies, and what policies might be most effective in changing the calculations of those orchestrating the violence–including both incentives and pressures for peace.

  • Omer Ismail, Jun 3, 2015
    The Many Faces of al-Bashir

    Recent shifts in the politics of the Persian Gulf could benefit the ruling coterie in economically isolated and politically ostracized Sudan. Sudan’s inclusion in the broader Arab coalition against the Houthis in Yemen, the recent agreement in April on a framework for a nuclear deal to be finalized between Iran, the United States, and others, and the rapprochement between Ethiopia and Egypt sealed by the Nile waters agreement, all dramatically alter Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir’s view of his opportunities. At first glance, these evolving relationships may make it harder for American policymakers, who are now part of the same fighting coalition as Sudan in Yemen, to exercise pressure on Sudan’s ruling National Congress Party (NCP). However, Western diplomats are not without options. Sudan’s growing economic dependence on Persian Gulf countries means that those countries now have even more leverage to press the NCP to agree to the political reforms and the negotiated compromises with the opposition that are needed to forge a lasting peace. American policymakers seeking to influence outcomes in Sudan should take advantage of their strong ties with the Gulf and the Gulf’s strong ties to Sudan.