U.S. Policy

SEC & Amnesty Petition for Review of Recent Conflict Minerals Rule Decision

In a promising development, on Friday, October 2 the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) and Amnesty International both filed petitions for a review of the most recent court decision on the SEC’s Conflict Minerals Rule.  Read More »

The Hill Op-ed: Time for the Senate to Confirm Gayle Smith

Gayle Smith

In this The Hill op-ed, Enough Project Founding Director John Prendergast urges the Senate to confirm Gayle Smith's nomination as USAID administrator.  Read More »

STUDENTS - APPLY NOW! Campus Organizer, Enough Project's Conflict-Free Campus Initiative

The Enough Project’s Conflict-Free Campus Initiative (CFCI) draws on the power of student leadership to support peace efforts in the Democratic Republic of Congo (Congo). CFCI students lead targeted activism campaigns aimed at addressing key impediments to peace, including the deadly conflict mineral trade. As a Campus Organizer for CFCI, you will be an essential part of strengthening the conflict-free movement on your campus. APPLY NOW!  Read More »

Enough and 120+ Organizations Call for Senate to Confirm Gayle Smith as USAID Administrator

In a letter to the Senate Leadership and Foreign Relations Committee Chairs, the Enough project joined 129 other organizations in calling on the Senate to swiftly confirm Gayle Smith as the next Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID).   Read More »

Congolese Members of Parliament to Obama: Appoint a Senior-Level U.S. Envoy to Congo Now

Secretary Kerry in Kinshasa, May 2014

Several Members of Parliament from the Democratic Republic of Congo declared last week in an open letter to President Obama the need for a new U.S. Special Envoy to Congo and the Great Lakes Region. They join NGOs, members of Congress, and Congolese experts in their call for Secretary of State John Kerry to swiftly fill the vacancy.  Read More »

Companies Mark Major Benchmark, Support a Conflict-Free Minerals Trade in Congo

Today marks the deadline for publicly traded companies in the United States to disclose the potential presence of conflict minerals in their supply chains, and what they’re doing about it. While many positive trends are emerging, implementation of Dodd-Frank 1502 is still in its nascent stages and there are many improvements still to be made. As Nobel Peace Prize Nominee and Sakahrov Prize Winner Dr. Denis Mukwege stated: "A conflict-free minerals industry would contribute to ending the unspeakable violence the people of Congo have endured for years."  Read More »

Guest Op-Ed: The Senate must act fast to confirm Gayle Smith

In this May 5 op-ed that originally appeared in The Hill, senior fellow at the Center for American Progress Molly Elgin-Cossart urges the U.S. Senate to quickly confirm the President's appointment of Gayle Smith as Administrator of the U.S. Agency for International Development.  Read More »

New Congo Report: Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush and How to Counter it

A trade in illegally mined and smuggled “conflict gold” is fueling both high-level military corruption and violent rebel groups in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to a new report by the Enough Project. “Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush: Bringing gold into the legal trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo,” by the Enough Project’s Fidel Bafilemba and Sasha Lezhnev, offers an in-depth portrait of the conflict gold supply chain, from muddy artisanal mines where gold is dug out with shovels and pick-axes, through illicit transport routes in Uganda, Burundi, and Dubai. Based on seven months of field research at mines and in regional capitals, the report provides an in-depth discussion of solutions to the conflict gold supply chain. The U.S. government, European Union, jewelers, socially responsible investors, the World Bank, and activists all have important roles to play.  Read More »

Congo's Conflict Gold Rush: Bringing Gold into the Legal Trade in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

A trade in illegally mined and smuggled “conflict gold” is fueling both high-level military corruption and violent rebel groups in eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), according to a new report by the Enough Project. “Congo’s Conflict Gold Rush: Bringing gold into the legal trade in the Democratic Republic of Congo,” by the Enough Project’s Fidel Bafilemba and Sasha Lezhnev, offers an in-depth portrait of the conflict gold supply chain, from muddy artisanal mines where gold is dug out with shovels and pick-axes, through illicit transport routes in Uganda, Burundi, and Dubai. Based on seven months of field research at mines and in regional capitals, the report provides an in-depth discussion of solutions to the conflict gold supply chain.

Enough 101: The GHRAVITY Executive Order and Sudan

In this 101, Sudan and South Sudan Policy Analyst Akshaya Kumar answers 5 questions about the GHRAVITY Executive Order (Grave Human Rights Abuses by the Governments of Iran and Syria Via Information Technology) and how it can be expanded to allow the U.S. to target the middle men and enablers of atrocities in Sudan.  Read More »

Syndicate content