U.S. Policy

New Comprehensive Study - "A Criminal State: Understanding and Countering Institutionalized Corruption and Violence in Congo"

Enough's new comprehensive study reveals how the Democratic Republic of Congo is not a failed state—for everyone. It is a failure for the vast majority of Congolese who suffer from abysmal security, healthcare, and education services. However, it is an efficient state for ruling elites and their commercial partners who seek to extract or traffic resources at the expense of Congo’s development. Over the past 130 years, Congo has had many elements of violent kleptocracy, a system of state capture in which ruling networks and commercial partners hijack governing institutions and maintain impunity for the purpose of resource extraction and for the security of the regime. Violence has been the systemic companion of these regimes.  This study argues that President Kabila and his close associates rely in large part on theft, violence, and impunity to stay in power at the expense of the country’s development. If international policymakers are to have a real impact in helping Congolese reformers actually reform the system, they need to shift the lens through which they view the conflict.  Read More »

U.S. Tools to Bankrupt Kleptocracy: Targeted and Sophisticated Sanctions Programs

Sanctions are well-suited to countering violent kleptocracies because of their ability to impact the target regime’s wealth. Sanctions can alter kleptocrats’ problematic incentive structures, which favor continued conflict over peace due to the prospect of financial gain from war. To be most effective, however, sanctions must be strategic in both design and implementation.

U.S. Tools to Bankrupt Kleptocracy: Anti-Money Laundering and Asset Seizure

Corruption and money laundering go hand in hand. Money laundering is the effort to legitimize wealth obtained through the commission of a crime, often known as a “predicate offense.” Fraud, theft, bribery, and other acts associated with corruption are considered to be predicate offenses in most jurisdictions. A wide range of anti-money laundering provisions have come into force over the past century that can be used to combat corruption. However, numerous loopholes that remain in place allow ill-gotten gains to enter the United States with ease and prevent efforts aimed at tracing and seizing the proceeds of corruption.

U.S. Tools to Bankrupt Kleptocracy: The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA)

The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act (FCPA) was passed in 1977 and prohibits U.S. persons from bribing foreign officials. The law was developed after an investigation by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission found that in order to secure business opportunities overseas, over 400 U.S. companies had paid hundreds of millions of dollars in bribes to foreign officials. The same investigation found that these firms were using “secret slush funds” and falsifying corporate records to disguise illicit payments to foreign officials (as well as illegal campaign contributions to U.S. politicians).

Enough Project’s Policy Director Brad Brooks-Rubin Testifies before Congress on U.S. Sanctions Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa

Brooks-Rubin testifying on June 8

On Wednesday June 8, Enough Project Policy Director, Brad Brooks-Rubin, testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s Subcommittee on Africa and Global Health Policy, convening for a session on “U.S. Sanctions Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa.”  Read More »

Enough’s Brooks-Rubin to Testify to Senate on Sub-Saharan Africa, New Approach to Sanctions

Date: 
Jun 6, 2016

This Wednesday, June 8th, Brad Brooks-Rubin, Policy Director at the Enough Project, will testify before the Senate on “U.S. Sanctions Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa,” detailing both successes and significant challenges of current sanctions policy, and presenting recommendations for a modernized approach to sanctions in the region.

A former official at the State Department and the Department of the Treasury, Brooks-Rubin will join other distinguished witnesses before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s Subcommittee on Africa and Global Health Policy.

When: Wednesday, June 8, 2016 at 2:15 PM

Where: Room 419, Dirksen Senate Office Building, Washington, DC 20510

Presiding: Senator Flake

Witnesses:

  • The Honorable Sue E. Eckert
    Senior Fellow, Watson Institute International And Public Affairs, Brown University
     
  • Dr. Todd Moss
    Chief Operating Officer And Senior Fellow, Center for Global Development
     
  • The Honorable Princeton N. Lyman
    Senior Advisor To The President, United States Institute of Peace
     
  • Mr. Brad Brooks-Rubin
    Director of Policy, Enough Project

Testimony livestream and hearing details:  http://www.foreign.senate.gov/hearings/us-sanctions-policy-in-sub-saharan-africa-060816

Interview availability: Mr. Brooks-Rubin will be available for selected media interviews following the hearing. For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact: Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org.

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT
The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention policy group, seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org

Companies File Third Round of Conflict Minerals Reports, SEC, Government Agencies Must Follow Through

May 31st marks the third annual deadline for electronics, manufacturing, and other companies to file conflict minerals reports with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC), as part of their obligation under Section 1502 of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act. With three years of reporting now completed, the SEC must follow through on its responsibility to hold companies accountable for the content of these reports by ensuring that companies have filed complete and accurate reports that meet regulatory requirements.  Read More »

Enough Project Statement on May 26th Congo Democracy Protests, Need for Targeted Sanctions

The Enough Project is deeply concerned about the growing political crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo. For over a year, citizens have been calling on President Kabila to indicate his intentions to step down, resulting in dozens of arbitrary arrests and detentions. Government security forces are continuing this trend of violent response to the country-wide demonstrations using tear gas, beatings, and bullets.   Read More »

STUDENTS - APPLY NOW! Campus Organizer, Enough Project's Conflict-Free Campus Initiative 2016-17

The Conflict-Free Campus Initiative (CFCI), a joint initiative of the Enough Project and STAND, draws on the power of student leadership and activism to support peace in the Democratic Republic of Congo. By encouraging school officials and stakeholders, both of which are large purchasers of electronics and powerful spokespersons, to commit to measures that pressure electronics companies to invest responsibly in Congo's minerals sector, students are voicing the demand for conflict-free products from Congo. As a Campus Organizer for CFCI, you will be an essential part of strengthening the conflict-free movement on your campus. APPLY NOW!  Read More »

Enough’s John Prendergast to Testify to Congress on South Sudan

Date: 
Apr 24, 2016

This Wednesday, April 27, John Prendergast, Founding Director of the Enough Project, will testify on “South Sudan’s Prospects for Peace and Security” alongside other distinguished witnesses before the House Foreign Affairs’ Subcommittee on Africa, Global Health, Global Human Rights, and International Organizations.

Mr. Prendergast will present specific recommendations for U.S. leadership, including imposing and enforcing targeted sanctions, to pressure South Sudan’s leaders to place the well-being of their people ahead of personal enrichment and power politics. Despite a formal peace agreement signed last August, armed conflict has continued while the South Sudanese people suffer mass atrocities, the displacement of millions, and an undeclared famine.

When: Wednesday, April 27, 2016, 2:00pm

Where: 2200 Rayburn House Office Building, Washington, DC 20515

Hearing details:  http://foreignaffairs.house.gov/hearing/subcommittee-hearing-south-sudan-s-prospects-peace-and-security

Testimony livestream: https://foreignaffairs.house.gov/live-video-feed

Interview availability: Mr. Prendergast will be available for selected media interviews following the hearing. For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact: Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org.

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT
The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention policy group, seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org.

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