Displacement

Already Wanted by ICC, Congo Warlord Ntaganda Continues to Use Child Soldiers

Bosco Ntaganda’s original arrest warrant from the International Criminal Court, or ICC, lists three war crimes charges all related to the use of child soldiers—enlistment, conscription, and use of children under the age of 15 in hostilities. The Office of the Prosecutor has recently requested for the ICC’s Pre-Trial Chamber to add to these charges, yet it is clear that the use of child soldiers is a particular trademark of Ntaganda.  Read More »

A Test for International Actors: Enforcing Sudan’s Withdrawal from Abyei

Taking the first of many steps deemed necessary by the international community for bringing South Sudan and Sudan back from the brink, the South Sudan government has pulled out its police forces from the Abyei area. The move, which was confirmed by U.N. peacekeepers on the ground officially on May 10, follows on decisions from both the African Union and the United Nations that redeployment “of all Sudanese and South Sudanese forces out of the Abyei Area” should take place within two weeks—or, by today.  Read More »

New Deadly FDLR Attacks as ICC Seeks Additional Arrest Warrants for Wanted Congolese War Criminals

The month-long mutiny orchestrated by Bosco Ntaganda has embroiled relatively peaceful areas of eastern Congo in conflict anew and, amid the uncertainty, reinvigorated some threats that previously seemed to be on the decline, most alarmingly spurring new attacks by the FDLR, as covered by Enough’s Congo research team yesterday. The rise in FDLR attacks and ongoing upheaval surrounding the Bosco mutiny makes news of new allegations of charges leveled by the International Criminal Court particularly judicious.  Read More »

Making the Most of the Capture of the LRA’s Caesar Acellam

The capture of Caesar Acellam, a high-ranking LRA commander, is a significant development in the effort to bring an end to the rebel group. His survival and safe capture should serve as a model for future encounters with LRA leaders and can be a real game changer provided that the U.S., Uganda, and other partners utilize this opportunity fully.  Read More »

Resurgence of FDLR Amid Army Rebellion in Eastern Congo

Bosco Ntaganda’s rebellion of ex-CNDP loyalists from the Congolese national army, or FARDC, has increased instability across the Kivus. One rebel group that is taking advantage of the security void left as the FARDC focuses on putting down the ex-CNDP rebellion is the notorious Rwandan Hutu-linked FDLR.  Read More »

5 Stories You May Have Missed This Week

A weekly round-up of must-read stories, posted every Friday (or on occasion, on Saturday).  Read More »

Ex-CNDP Loses Key Strongholds, but Voices Demands amid Ceasefire

GOMA, Democratic Republic of Congo -- The Congolese military, or FARDC, has kicked out ex-CNDP mutineers from various strongholds in Masisi territory—including Mushaki, Kitchanga, and Burungu—­after days of intense fighting last week. This exchange of power marks an important shift, as government forces have, for the first time since the creation of the CNDP rebel group in 2006, succeeded in pushing the CNDP out of some of its most important strongholds.  Read More »

Tensions Rise as Rumors Spread: Is Kony in Darfur?

Allegations have recently emerged that Joseph Kony, leader of the Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA, is in the Darfur region of Sudan and receiving support from the Sudanese government. These rumors have sparked threats of military intervention by Uganda, which could escalate the existing low-level border conflict between Sudan and South Sudan.  Read More »

SEC Urged to Release Delayed Rules on Conflict Minerals Trade

Date: 
May 10, 2012

Contact:
Global Witness: Jana Morgan at 703 795 8542 or jmorgan@globalwitness.org
Corinna Gilfillan at 202 725 8705 or cgilfillan@globalwitness.org
Enough Project: Matt Brown at 202 468 2925 or mbrown@enoughproject.org

WASHINGTON – The Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) needs to issue regulations to tackle the trade in minerals fuelling conflict and human rights abuses in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), a group of non-profits, investors and companies said today. A provision directing the SEC to publish rules on conflict minerals by April 2011 was passed as part of the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act.

The law includes a disclosure requirement that calls on companies to determine whether their products contain conflict minerals by carrying out supply chain due diligence and to report this to the SEC. For over a decade, rebel groups and senior commanders of the Congolese national army have made millions of dollars through the illegal control of mines and trading routes, while inflicting appalling human rights abuses on the local population, including gender-based violence such as rape and sexual slavery.

“The passage of the Dodd-Frank Act has led to positive developments in eastern Congo to demilitarize mining areas,” said Corinna Gilfillan of Global Witness. “The Congolese government recently adopted a law requiring all mining and mineral trading companies operating in the DRC to carry out due diligence measures. The long delays in the rule-making process threaten to reverse this progress and undermine efforts to develop a clean minerals trade.”

Amol Mehra of the International Corporate Accountability Roundtable, said: “Armed groups and factions of the Congolese army continue to profit from the minerals trade at the expense of the civilian population. The SEC must come out with rules now to tackle this deadly trade and to provide consumers and investors with important information about companies’ efforts to take responsibility for their supply chains and sourcing practices,”

Industry groups are also spearheading due diligence programs across the global supply chain to comply with Dodd-Frank and further delays in the rules risks slowing this momentum.

“A few industry leaders are ahead of the pack basing their actions on the rules as originally proposed. Unfortunately, most companies have been reluctant to move ahead given the uncertainty of the final wording which will dictate the compliance requirements. This is an unfortunate situation and demonstrates the need for the SEC to act swiftly and issue the final rules.” said Dr. Daniel Persico of KEMET Electronics Corporation.

“Leading companies are moving forward with preparation based on the proposed rules. However, uncertainty about compliance requirements will only continue to grow until finalized regulations are issued,” said Tim Mohin of Advanced Micro Devices.

“We support the timely release of this rule as this issue is too important to delay action,” said Gary Niekerk of Intel.

“Congress has a responsibility to act to ensure that the SEC issues timely rules on conflict minerals. Congress passed the conflict mineral provision to address a humanitarian crisis, and until the SEC issues rules, Congressional intent will continue to be compromised” said Darren Fenwick, Senior Manger of Government Affairs for the Enough Project.

Companies, investors and NGOs believe that getting the rules out is an important step forward in breaking the link between conflict and minerals and that all stakeholders must work together to address the dire humanitarian crisis in eastern DRC.

It is important for the SEC to release strong rules now to ensure all affected companies bring the requisite pressure to bear to incentivize responsible sourcing from the region.

"Investors will benefit by gaining confidence that companies they own-- or may own-- are moving rapidly to ensure that their supply chains and products are free of conflict minerals", said Bennett Freeman, SVP-Sustainability Research and Policy at Calvert Investments. "Investors and consumers alike need to know that companies are undertaking appropriate due diligence to diminish this risk," Freeman added.

Taking the Terminator: Congo’s Opportunity to Bring Bosco Ntaganda to Justice

The recent turbulent events on the ground in eastern Congo present a unique opportunity for the Congolese government to finally take steps to arrest Bosco Ntaganda and deliver him to justice. In a new report released today, “Taking the Terminator: Congo’s Golden Opportunity to Deliver a Warlord to Justice,” the Enough Project provides background information on Ntaganda and his rebellion, describes the implications of his recent mutiny, and offers recommendations for the U.S. and partner donor nations.  Read More »

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