Displacement

Hijacking the Congo Conflict Minerals Narrative

In a post last week, we covered a recent Congressional hearing on the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform Act’s section 1502. Tom Murphy, a blogger on international development issues respected by many of us here at the Enough Project for his thoughtful and balanced criticism of some human rights advocacy initiatives, featured a response on his blog. In the post, Murphy criticizes the narrative of “Profits vs. People” (the title of Enough’s post) as dismissive of the legitimate debate about the positive and negative impacts that the conflict minerals provision is having on the mining sector in the Democratic Republic of Congo.  Read More »

Enough 101: The Lord’s Resistance Army in Darfur

This week's post in the series Enough 101 looks at the history of Sudanese backing of the Lord's Resistance Army and the group's presence in Sudan's Darfur region.  Read More »

UPDATE: Tracking Compliance with U.N. Security Council Resolution 2046 on Sudan and South Sudan

In the wake of U.N. Special Envoy to Sudan and South Sudan Haile Menkerios’ briefing to the U.N. Security Council on May 16 concerning Sudan and South Sudan’s compliance with Resolution 2046, Khartoum remains, in many respects, defiant. In an effort to track these and other developments, the Enough Project has updated its timeline and chart that track Sudan, South Sudan, and the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement-North’s compliance.  Read More »

New Amendment Bars Non-Humanitarian U.S. Aid to Countries Hosting Sudan’s Bashir

Despite being wanted by the International Criminal Court for genocide and crimes against humanity, Omar al-Bashir remains comfortably in power as the president of Sudan. In an effort to boost international pressure to have him arrested, the House Appropriations Committee recently adopted an amendment which would cut off all non-humanitarian aid to countries that allow Bashir to travel within their borders. The amendment was offered by Representative Frank Wolf (R-VA) who has a longstanding history of championing Sudanese issues on the Hill.  Read More »

5 Stories You Might Have Missed This Week

A weekly round-up of must-read stories, posted every Friday.  Read More »

Already Wanted by ICC, Congo Warlord Ntaganda Continues to Use Child Soldiers

Bosco Ntaganda’s original arrest warrant from the International Criminal Court, or ICC, lists three war crimes charges all related to the use of child soldiers—enlistment, conscription, and use of children under the age of 15 in hostilities. The Office of the Prosecutor has recently requested for the ICC’s Pre-Trial Chamber to add to these charges, yet it is clear that the use of child soldiers is a particular trademark of Ntaganda.  Read More »

A Test for International Actors: Enforcing Sudan’s Withdrawal from Abyei

Taking the first of many steps deemed necessary by the international community for bringing South Sudan and Sudan back from the brink, the South Sudan government has pulled out its police forces from the Abyei area. The move, which was confirmed by U.N. peacekeepers on the ground officially on May 10, follows on decisions from both the African Union and the United Nations that redeployment “of all Sudanese and South Sudanese forces out of the Abyei Area” should take place within two weeks—or, by today.  Read More »

New Deadly FDLR Attacks as ICC Seeks Additional Arrest Warrants for Wanted Congolese War Criminals

The month-long mutiny orchestrated by Bosco Ntaganda has embroiled relatively peaceful areas of eastern Congo in conflict anew and, amid the uncertainty, reinvigorated some threats that previously seemed to be on the decline, most alarmingly spurring new attacks by the FDLR, as covered by Enough’s Congo research team yesterday. The rise in FDLR attacks and ongoing upheaval surrounding the Bosco mutiny makes news of new allegations of charges leveled by the International Criminal Court particularly judicious.  Read More »

Making the Most of the Capture of the LRA’s Caesar Acellam

The capture of Caesar Acellam, a high-ranking LRA commander, is a significant development in the effort to bring an end to the rebel group. His survival and safe capture should serve as a model for future encounters with LRA leaders and can be a real game changer provided that the U.S., Uganda, and other partners utilize this opportunity fully.  Read More »

Resurgence of FDLR Amid Army Rebellion in Eastern Congo

Bosco Ntaganda’s rebellion of ex-CNDP loyalists from the Congolese national army, or FARDC, has increased instability across the Kivus. One rebel group that is taking advantage of the security void left as the FARDC focuses on putting down the ex-CNDP rebellion is the notorious Rwandan Hutu-linked FDLR.  Read More »

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