Sudan and South Sudan

John Prendergast on CNN International: South Sudan's Anniversary Marks Little to Celebrate

Enough Project's John Prendergast discusses the problems still plaguing South Sudan as the country marks its fourth Independence Day.

Enough Project's John Prendergast discusses the problems still plaguing South Sudan as the country marks its fourth Independence Day with CNN International's Isha Sesay.

 

 

Sudan Tribune Op-ed: Sudan’s Civil Disobedience: Africa’s latest "Hashtag Revolution"?

“Because of the nature of the dictatorship we are under, you are forced to embrace the use of social media, ...It’s not secure to try and use the tactics used in the ‘90s — demonstrations openly or on a daily basis — because we can never match the current government when it comes to violence. So we have resorted to a peaceful, constitutional revolution, which we are precipitating through the use of social media.” That was a Zimbabwean activist by the name of Mlambo, speaking to a correspondent of National Public Radio on October 21, 2016.  Read More »

Sudan: Civil Disobedience Campaign Continues as Economic Crisis Looms

Sunday marked the first day in a three-day civil disobedience campaign across Sudan. Although the Sudanese government dismissed the level of participation as insignificant, local reporting in Khartoum shows that many Sudanese people joined in the first day of this campaign. Numerous shops remained closed in Khartoum and Omdurman and many parents kept their children home from school. Although the government tried to portray Sunday as a typical day in Khartoum, the difference was evident in the lack of automobile and pedestrian traffic in normally congested areas.  Read More »

The Economist Op-ed: Stop the Cash, Stop the Conflict

The world’s newest country, South Sudan, could have been holding its first free elections in 2017. Instead, it faces another year of strife. In the latest phase of the cyclical conflict that has plagued its people for decades, tens of thousands have died, 5m people face hunger or starvation and 1m have become refugees. Yet cleverer global action—especially involving Western banks—can stop the rot.  Read More »

As Warnings of Genocide in South Sudan Increase, U.S. to Introduce UNSC Resolution for Targeted Sanctions, Arms Embargo

On November 17, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power announced that the United States will introduce a resolution in the U.N. Security Council for targeted sanctions and an arms embargo for South Sudan.  Read More »

U.S. to Introduce UN Security Council Resolution for Targeted Sanctions, Arms Embargo on South Sudan

Date: 
Nov 17, 2016

 

As threat of genocide looms, Enough Project lauds urgently-needed step, calls for swift adoption

Today, U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Samantha Power announced that the U.S. will introduce a resolution in the U.N. Security Council for targeted sanctions and an arms embargo for South Sudan. The Enough Project urges U.N. Security Council members to support the resolution to address the crisis in South Sudan. 

John Prendergast, Founding Director at the Enough Project, said: “South Sudan faces the very real threat of genocide. It is critical that the U.N. Security Council not stand idly by while the crisis intensifies. A resolution by the United States will be a critical first step to demonstrating that the international community will create significant consequences for the commission of mass atrocities.”

Prendergast added, "Every genocide early warning system is flashing red in South Sudan today. All of the classic elements are present for mass atrocities to unfold, and when atrocities are targeted at specific communities on the basis of their identity, that is genocide. The UN Security Council has the tools to bring pressure to bear on those that would consider using mass atrocities to maintain or gain power. In the 21st century, we need to draw a line in the sand and say that genocidal action will not be allowed to occur without a significant consequence."

  • U.N. Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon and U.N. Special Adviser on the Prevention of Genocide Adama Dieng have both warned in recent days of the threat of genocide in South Sudan.
  • Many South Sudanese people and U.N. officials have called repeatedly for an arms embargo.
  • More than 2.8 million people have been displaced in South Sudan since conflict began in December 2013.
Read the September 2015 investigative report from The Sentry providing evidence of high-level corruption linked to individuals named in U.N. Security Council reporting for their responsibility for conflict and atrocities: https://thesentry.org/reports/warcrimesshouldntpay/

Enough Project experts are available for comment and analysis.

For media inquiries or interview requests, please contact:

Greg Hittelman, Director of Communications, +1 310 717 0606gh@enoughproject.org.

About THE ENOUGH PROJECT
The Enough Project, an atrocity prevention policy group, seeks to build leverage for peace and justice in Africa by helping to create real consequences for the perpetrators and facilitators of genocide and other mass atrocities. Enough aims to counter rights-abusing armed groups and violent kleptocratic regimes that are fueled by grand corruption, transnational crime and terror, and the pillaging and trafficking of minerals, ivory, diamonds, and other natural resources. Enough conducts field research in conflict zones, develops and advocates for policy recommendations, supports social movements in affected countries, and mobilizes public campaigns. Learn more – and join us – at www.EnoughProject.org.

About THE SENTRY
The Sentry seeks to disrupt and dismantle the networks of military officers, government officials, businessmen, arms dealers, bankers, and other enablers who benefit financially and politically from Africa’s deadliest conflicts. Our investigations follow the money from conflict zones and into global economic centers, using open source data collection, field research, document collection, and state-of-the-art network analysis technology. The Sentry provides information and analysis that engages civil society and media, supports regulatory action and prosecutions, and provides policymakers and the private sector with the information they require to take effective action. Co-founded by George Clooney and John Prendergast, The Sentry is an initiative of the Enough Project and Not On Our Watch (NOOW), with its implementing partner C4ADS. Current countries of focus are South Sudan, Sudan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Somalia, and the Central African Republic. Learn more at TheSentry.org

Daily Maverick Op-ed: Sudan – Real and Imagined

There are two Sudans: one real and one imagined. In the imaginary Sudan, President Omar al-Bashir’s government is leading a meaningful National Dialogue that will address grievances, reconcile differences, and eventually lead to a democratic state. In this fictitious Sudan, the Sudan Armed Forces fight a just war against unappeasable rebels in the country’s south, while instability and violent conflict are largely a thing of the past in Darfur.  Read More »

TIME Op-Ed: How to Ensure Lasting Peace in South Sudan

The world’s newest country, South Sudan, finds itself mired in the complicated fog of war that at its worst could combine the genocidal ethnic targeting of 1994 Rwanda with the warlordism of 1990s Somalia. Tens of thousands have died and millions displaced, and armed rebellions are emerging throughout the country. Village attacks, food aid obstruction, mass rape and child soldier recruitment all are rearing their ugly heads again.   Read More »

New Amnesty International Report Accuses Sudan of Using Chemical Weapons in Darfur

Amnesty International’s newly released report “Scorched Earth, Poisoned air,” documents the use of chemical weapons by the Sudanese government in the Jebel Marra region of Darfur.  Read More »

Formation of New Rebel Movement Increases Number of Armed Groups in South Sudan

On the September 27, 2016, a new rebel movement formerly allied to David Yau Yau - and calling itself the Cobra faction - defected from the South Sudanese government. Led by General Khalid Boutros, a former deputy to Yau Yau, the group has declared war against the government.  Read More »

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