Lord's Resistance Army

Rwanda 20 Darfur 10: New Responses to Africa's Mass Atrocities

As commemorations unfold honoring the 20th anniversary of the onset of Rwanda’s genocide and the 10th year after Darfur’s genocide was recognized, the rhetoric of commitment to the prevention of mass atrocities has never been stronger.

Photo:Nyaza cemetery outside Kigali, Rwanda - AP/Ricardo Mazalan

Mass Atrocity Prevention Post Rwanda and Darfur

Date: 
Apr 7, 2014

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
 
Contact: Mark Quarterman, mquarterman@enoughproject.org, 202-372-6295
 
Mass Atrocity Prevention Post Rwanda and Darfur

 
Washington, DC – Today, Rwandans and the international community will commemorate the 20th anniversary of the 1994 genocide that killed 800,000 Tutsis and moderate Hutus in 100 days. As commemorations unfold worldwide, an Enough Project report, released today, discusses modern mass atrocity prevention as we mark the anniversary of Rwanda’s genocide and recognize the 10th year of genocide in Darfur. The report “Rwanda 20 and Darfur 10: New Responses to Africa's Mass Atrocities” calls for a renewed approach to addressing the interlinked nature of modern-day African conflicts and mass atrocity crimes. 

In the twenty years since the Rwandan genocide, Africa’s wars have become increasingly marked by integrated conflict systems, which spill over borders and include an array of armed groups. The conflicts, spanning the Horn of Africa, East Africa, and Central Africa, have taken the lives of hundreds of thousands of people. Conventional peace processes and peacekeeping operations, however, are limited in scope and have largely failed to address the complexities of modern African conflict and mass atrocities. As a result, they fail to address the core systemic drivers of violence. 

Enough Project co-founder and author of the report, John Prendergast, says: 

"Without addressing the complicated transnational root causes of conflict and mass atrocities, without being much more inclusive, without dealing decisively with spoilers, and without integrating broader regional actors, today’s peace processes have no chance of producing sustainable peace."

To combat this, the report argues for new approaches to peacemaking and civilian protection that make a real difference in the lives of people in conflict-ridden regions. A new strategy should be marked by broader peace mechanisms, which include an effective response system from the international community and comprehensive and regional peace processes that address core drivers of conflict.

Read the report, “Rwanda 20 and Darfur 10: New Responses to Africa's Mass Atrocities” -  http://www.enoughproject.org/files/Rwanda-20-and-Darfur-10.pdf 

Kasper Agger on CCTV Africa: US Steps Up Bid to Find Joseph Kony

Uganda's military has welcomed a move by the United States to offer additional support to help in tracking wanted warlord Joseph Kony. The U.S is sending 150 Air Force Special Operations personnel and at least four advanced Osprey aircraft.

Uganda's military has welcomed a move by the United States to offer additional support to help in tracking wanted warlord Joseph Kony. The U.S is sending 150 Air Force Special Operations personnel and at least four advanced Osprey aircraft.

New Obama Administration Support to Counter-LRA Mission Boosts Efforts to Prevent Atrocities in Central Africa

On March 23, the Obama administration announced that it will bolster the counter-LRA mission by deploying at least four helicopters to help find Joseph Kony.   Read More »

Enough Project Applauds Obama Administration's Bolstering of Counter-LRA Mission

Date: 
Mar 24, 2014

Enough Project Media Advisory

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Contact: Sandi Fox, sfox@enoughproject.org, 202-478-6325

Enough Project Applauds Obama Administration's Bolstering of Counter-LRA Mission

WASHINGTON, DC -- The Obama administration announced on March 23 that it will enhance the counter-LRA mission by deploying at least four high-speed, troop-transporting CV-22 Osprey helicopters. The helicopters will support the African Union Regional Task Force.

The Enough Project is encouraged by the additional support offered by the administration and applauds President Obama’s dedication to ending the LRA, which has been killing civilians and abducting children in central Africa since 1987.

Enough Project Field Researcher Kasper Agger said:

“The Osprey helicopters are a critical new piece of the puzzle in the mission to end the LRA. This will enable the African partner forces of the U.S. to be able to act swiftly to apprehend Kony and other LRA leaders who continue to terrorize civilians in central Africa. The deployment confirms the U.S. resolve regarding the mission and sends a strong signal about the Obama administration’s commitment to atrocity prevention.”

Sasha Lezhnev said:

“The new U.S. helicopters are like a turbo boost for the mission to find Kony. They give the operation the ability to act much more quickly on intelligence. The forces will now be able to search in several places at once, and when there is a report of Kony's whereabouts, the Ospreys can get there quickly. The White House deserves praise for bolstering the LRA mission, as backing off would allow Kony to regroup and perpetrate mass atrocities once again.”

#

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Op-ed: The New Face of African Conflict

As a new wave of violent conflicts has ravaged Africa, borders and conventional peace processes have done little to contain them.  Read More »

LRA Crisis Tracker Report

This week, Enough Project partners The Resolve and Invisible Children released the 2013 LRA Crisis Tracker Annual Security Brief. The brief analyzes data on the Lord’s Resistance Army (LRA) gathered over the course of the year, touching on a wide range of critical issues like attacks, abductions, defections and whereabouts. It provides vital updates and recommendations, encouraging the continuation of regional and international efforts to counter the group’s activities.  Read More »

The US Takes New, Robust Steps to Combat Illegal Wildlife Poaching and Trafficking

For the first time, the United States has announced a National Strategy for Combating Wildlife Trafficking and a ban on the commercial trade of elephant ivory. This new strategy aims to “ensure that the United States is not contributing to poaching of elephants and illegal trade in elephant ivory.” Essentially, the U.S. ban prohibits commercial imports and exports in the hopes of leading a global effort to effectively protect and preserve our world’s wildlife and develop respect for the rule of law.The announcement also pledged to work closely with Congress to strengthen existing laws that combat wildlife trafficking and to adopt new ones to increase our ability to end this global challenge.  Read More »

Counter-LRA Mission Challenged by Regional Turmoil

U.S. military advisors and their African partner forces are facing increased difficulties in their mission to end the threat of the Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA, and to capture rebel leader Joseph Kony, because of heightened regional instability and insufficient helicopter support.

CAR, South Sudan Turmoil Challenge Counter-LRA Mission

Date: 
Jan 30, 2014

 Enough Project Press Release

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE: 12:01am EST, January 30, 2014 

Contact: Carine Umuhumuza, cumuhumuza@enoughproject.org, 202-478-5314

Kampala, Uganda and Washington,DC — U.S. military advisors and African partner forces are facing new difficulties in their mission to end the Lord’s Resistance Army, or LRA, and to capture rebel leader Joseph Kony, because of heightened regional instability and insufficient helicopter support, argues a new Enough Project report. Drawing on field research and interviews, the report, “Counter-LRA Mission Challenged by Regional Turmoil,” analyzes the effect of intensifying conflict in South Sudan and the Central African Republic on the LRA’s tactics and the counter-LRA mission’s resources.

The report’s author, Uganda-based Enough Project field researcher Kasper Agger, says:

“Violence in CAR and South Sudan is diverting attention and military forces from counter-LRA operations and providing a dream scenario for LRA rebels to hide and avoid capture. International resolve to end the LRA must be sustained. History has shown that when the pressure is off, the LRA rebuilds its forces through violent abductions and target vulnerable civilians.”
 
The counter-LRA mission also faces air transportation needs that exceed capacity. African troops and U.S. advisors need additional helicopters to be able to act on timely intelligence, conduct simultaneous operations to track top commanders in multiple locations, resupply deployed troops, protect civilians, and facilitate emergency evacuations. The new report argues that the U.S. government should send additional helicopters that have the speed, versatility, and transport capabilities that could best serve the mission and help counter-LRA forces keep pace with highly mobile LRA rebel groups that operate in vast and isolated areas.

The report also urges the U.N, African Union, European Union, and U.S. to maintain their current levels of financial, military, and diplomatic support for the AU-led efforts against the LRA to sustain momentum in the counter-LRA mission.

Read the report, "Counter-LRA Mission Challenged by Regional Turmoil":  http://www.enoughproject.org/files/Counter-LRA%20Mission%20Challenged%20by%20Regional%20Turmoil.pdf

#

The Enough Project is a project of the Center for American Progress to end genocide and crimes against humanity. Founded in 2007, Enough focuses on the crises in Sudan, South Sudan, eastern Congo, and areas affected by the Lord’s Resistance Army. Enough conducts intensive field research, develops practical policies to address these crises, and shares sensible tools to empower citizens and groups working for change. To learn more about Enough, go to www.enoughproject.org.

Syndicate content