Eastern Congo

Wyden: ‘Fundamentally Wrong’ If Congress Ignores Conflict Minerals

Yesterday, my colleagues at the Enough Project and I had the great honor of participating in a special briefing co-hosted by Senators Ron Wyden (D-OR) and Sam Brownback (R-KS) on the illicit minerals trade and epidemic of sexual violence in eastern Congo.  Read More »

A Quick Guide to the Lord’s Resistance Army Bill

As The Lord’s Resistance Army Disarmament and Northern Uganda Recovery Act of 2009 (S.1067/H.R. 2478) moves closer to final passage by both the House and Senate and on to President Obama’s desk, here is a short guide to this important and historic piece of legislation  Read More »

Stanford Paving the Way for Conflict-free Investing

In this guest post, Mia Newman of STAND at Stanford writes about an impressive move by a panel overseeing the university's investments that could lead Stanford to consider a company's efforts to combat conflict minerals before investing university money.  Read More »

Briefing: Congo: Cell Phones, Conflict Trade, and the Worst Sexual Violence in the World

Date: 
May 3, 2010

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE:

CONTACT: Jonathan Hutson, jhutson@enoughproject.org
202-386-1618

The conflict in eastern Congo is being fueled by a multi-million dollar trade in minerals essential to our electronic products. Over five million people have died as a result, and hundreds of thousands of women have been raped over the past decade. The armed groups perpetuating the violence generate an estimated $183 million each year by trading in four main minerals -- tin, tungsten, tantalum, and gold. Learn about current legislative efforts that begin to address the violence in Congo.

There will be a press availability outside the Senate Finance Committee Room  from 3:15-3:30 p.m.

WHAT: Press Availability on Congo: Cell Phones, Conflict Minerals, and the Worst Sexual Violence in the World.

WHEN: Wednesday, May 5, 3:15-3:30 p.m. Eastern.

WHERE: Outside the Senate Finance Committee Room, Dirksen Senate Office Building, 2nd Floor

SPEAKERS:

U.S. Senator Ron Wyden (D-OR)

U.S. Senator Sam Brownback (R-KS)

U.S. Representative Jim McDermott (D-WA)

Lisa Shannon, Founder of Run for Congo Women and author: A Thousand Sisters

Dominique Bikaba, Congolese Advocate

John Prendergast, Co-founder of the Enough Project at Center for American Progress

A staff briefing will take place in the Senate Finance Committee Room from 3:30-4:30 p.m.  This event is CLOSED TO THE PRESS.

House, Senate Conflict Minerals Bills Gain Ground

It's been a big week for the Conflict Minerals Trade Act, or H.R. 4128.  Not only did the bill pass out of the Foreign Affairs Committee, bringing it one step closer to becoming law, it also picked up four new cosponsors, making the total 39.  Read More »

5 Best Stories You Might Have Missed This Week

A weekly round-up of must-read stories, posted every Friday.  Read More »

NYC Event: Representations of Africa

If you happen to be in New York City this evening, Columbia University’s Teachers College is hosting a panel that will be worth checking out called “Representations of Africa,” hosted by the school’s Center for African Education and the African Studies Working Group. I'll be there, representing Enough Said.  Read More »

Conflict Minerals, LRA Bills Face Key House Committee

US Capitol

For activists and legislators who have been working hard to promote the Conflict Minerals Trade Act (H.R. 4128) and the Lord’s Resistance Army Disarmament and Northern Uganda Recovery Act, today is a big day.  Read More »

Spotlight on Mwenga, Scene of FDLR Atrocities

Amani Matabaro

Surrounded with thick forests and jungles, Mwenga is southwest of the provincial capital of Bukavu. It is one of the areas in eastern Congo most affected by war, by the unspeakable abductions, rape, looting, and killings by the rebel group FDLR.  Read More »

Does LRA Presence in Garamba Constitute A Real Threat to Uganda?

The Ugandan Daily Monitor published today parts of an internal MONUC report which claims that the LRA is returning to Garamba National Park in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. In fact, some LRA rebels never left.  Read More »

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