Blog Posts in Sudan and South Sudan

Posted by John Hursh on Jun 21, 2016
Newly displaced persons in Sortoni, North Darfur, following clashes between rebe

The backlash from leading humanitarian and development organizations continues over the European Union’s recent plan to work with Sudan and other repressive regimes to address irregular migration flows and stop refugees from reaching Europe. This plan would partner the EU with Sudan, despite Sudan President Omar al-Bashir’s outstanding International Criminal Court arrest warrants and the regime’s terrible human rights record, and Eritrea, where a 2016 United Nations Commission of Inquiry found that Eritrean government officials have committed crimes against humanity, including enslavement, rape, and torture, over the past 25 years.

Posted by John Hursh on Jun 16, 2016

This week, the United Nations verified that at least 80,000 Darfuris fled their homes due to armed conflict near Jebel Marra earlier this year. The total number of displaced may very well be closer to 127,000, but the Government of Sudan refuses to allow U.N. or A.U. personnel access to conflict-affected areas, making verification extremely difficult. 

Posted by Enough Team on Jun 15, 2016
Brooks-Rubin testifying on June 8

On Wednesday June 8, Enough Project Policy Director, Brad Brooks-Rubin, testified before the Senate Foreign Relations Committee’s Subcommittee on Africa and Global Health Policy, convening for a session on “U.S. Sanctions Policy in Sub-Saharan Africa.”

Posted by Enough Team on Jun 10, 2016

In a recent op-ed, “South Sudan Needs Truth, Not Trials,” South Sudan President Salva Kiir and First Vice President Riek Machar argue that the only way to bring South Sudan together is through “an organized peace and reconciliation commission with international backing.” In this process, they argue that anyone who tells the truth concerning what they saw or did would receive amnesty from prosecution, even if he or she did not express remorse.

Posted by Enough Team on May 24, 2016

Today, the Enough Project released its latest policy brief by Founding Director John Prendergast, “The Paper Tiger in South Sudan: Threats without Consequences for Atrocities and Kleptocracy”. Based on Prendergast’s testimony before a hearing in Congress last month, the brief outlines how the primary root cause for the atrocities and instability that mark South Sudan’s short history is that its government quickly morphed into a violent kleptocracy.