Blog Posts in Sudan and South Sudan

Posted by Enough Team on Sep 15, 2014

In the past week, Sudanese activists have launched two dynamic campaigns that draw attention to their government's ongoing crimes and call on the international community to respond with decisive action. Both efforts showcase the energy and commitment of Sudanese activists to challenging their government's abuses. The Enough Project stands in solidarity with these brave activists and fully supports their call for change. 

Posted by Enough Team on Sep 15, 2014

Ten years ago this week, then-Secretary of State Colin Powell declared that genocide had been committed in Darfur and that the government of Sudan and the janjaweed bore responsibility for those acts. Even though it did not actually trigger a legal obligation to act, many hoped that using the "g word" meant that the United States was crossing the Rubicon and committing itself to stopping the violence in Darfur, Sudan's most troubled region. The janjaweed, however, are still at large in Darfur -- and with the Sudanese government's help, they are now arguably more powerful than ever.

Posted by Enough Team on Aug 27, 2014

Approximately 94,000 people are displaced and sheltering in U.N. bases throughout South Sudan as a result of ongoing conflict. In the midst of dire conditions and grave humanitarian needs, the agencies at one Protection of Civilians site in Tong Ping, Juba have found a simple yet highly effective approach to meeting the information needs of internally displaced persons– broadcasting news from roving “boda boda” motorbikes.

Posted by Enough Team on Aug 18, 2014
The aftermath of the bombing, Photo by author

I'm a doctor, not a writer. But the situation I witnessed while volunteering in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan compels me to write and tell the story of what is happening there. Since 2011, the only hospital in the entire Nuba Mountains region, Mother of Mercy in Gidel, had been spared bombardment – until last month. 

Posted by Akshaya Kumar on Aug 12, 2014

For the past two months, the Enough Project has been counting down to mediators' 60 day deadline to establish a transitional government of national unity for South Sudan. Now that the deadline has passed, a chorus of voices from across the globe have threatened South Sudan's leaders with punitive measures and targeted sanctions.