Blog Posts in Sudan and South Sudan

Posted by Sentry Team on Nov 18, 2015

South Sudan’s Minister of Justice Paulino Wanawilla recently acknowledged the existence of corrupt officials in the Ministry of Justice, as well as throughout the government. This is a significant statement highlighting the pervasive nature of corruption in South Sudan. In a recent article, the Sudan Tribune quotes the Minister as saying, ““I know in South Sudan corruption is not in one place, but it’s very sad when everybody is stealing.”

Posted by Enough Team on Nov 10, 2015

The African Union’s long-awaited report on the crisis in South Sudan strongly makes the case that sustainable peace must not only address justice for victims of atrocities but also tackle the underlying economic sources of the conflict, which Enough argues include the pursuit by individuals of their own economic interests at the expense of the South Sudanese people.

Posted by Enough Team on Oct 30, 2015

An African Union report on the crisis in South Sudan says rebel soldiers committed gross human rights abuses that include rape and ethnically targeted killings of civilians. The report released by a Commission of Inquiry this week, interviewed witnesses in the towns of Bor, Malakal and Bentiu, who all testified about the abuse they endured in rebel hands after the capture of these locations at the onset of the war.

Posted by Enough Team on Oct 29, 2015

Approaching the one-year mark of a mass rape in Tabit, North Darfur, Human Rights Watch (HRW) has released a dispatch calling on the United Nations to do more to protect the survivors and those still at risk. This publication follows HRW’s October 12 dispatch detailing ongoing violations of women’s rights in Sudan’s conflict zones as well as the regime’s application of repressive and discriminatory laws to diminish the ability of women to participate in public life.

Posted by Enough Team on Oct 28, 2015
Displaced civilians seek refuge at an UNMISS facility in Juba on Dec 16, 2013

A long-delayed African Union report on the crisis in South Sudan says that the targeted killings of hundreds of Nuer tribesmen in Juba in December 2013, was a deliberate action sponsored by the state. According to the report, the method by which the killings were committed prove their “widespread or systematic nature.” Roadblocks were established around Juba and security forces undertook house-to-house searches. Male Nuers were “targeted, identified, killed on the spot or gathered in one place and killed.”