Blog Posts in Justice and Accountability

Posted by Enough Team on Oct 27, 2016

Enough's new comprehensive study reveals how the Democratic Republic of Congo is not a failed state—for everyone. It is a failure for the vast majority of Congolese who suffer from abysmal security, healthcare, and education services. However, it is an efficient state for ruling elites and their commercial partners who seek to extract or traffic resources at the expense of Congo’s development. Over the past 130 years, Congo has had many elements of violent kleptocracy, a system of state capture in which ruling networks and commercial partners hijack governing institutions and maintain impunity for the purpose of resource extraction and for the security of the regime. Violence has been the systemic companion of these regimes.  This study argues that President Kabila and his close associates rely in large part on theft, violence, and impunity to stay in power at the expense of the country’s development. If international policymakers are to have a real impact in helping Congolese reformers actually reform the system, they need to shift the lens through which they view the conflict.

Posted by Enough Team on May 26, 2016

The Enough Project is deeply concerned about the growing political crisis in the Democratic Republic of Congo. For over a year, citizens have been calling on President Kabila to indicate his intentions to step down, resulting in dozens of arbitrary arrests and detentions. Government security forces are continuing this trend of violent response to the country-wide demonstrations using tear gas, beatings, and bullets. 

Posted by Enough Team on Feb 22, 2016
Photo: Erberto Zani / www.erbertozani.com

In a new Enough Project report based on 2015 and 2016 field research in eastern Congo, Senior Policy Analyst Holly Dranginis provides a status update on the impact of Dodd-Frank 1502 in Congo, including progress, challenges, and policy recommendations for continued improvements.

Posted by Enough Team on Apr 1, 2015

Yesterday, in an historic election, Nigeria had its first peaceful and democratic power transfer. This month, Africa will see another election, in President Omar al Bashir's Sudan. Unfortunately, there, elections don't necessarily mean choice. Given current restrictions on civil society organizations, some fear that if the elections proceed on April 13th, they will only intensify the conflict and worsen the humanitarian crisis in Sudan.

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 24, 2015
Credit: Holly Dranginis/Enough Project

In recognition of one of the newest universal human rights, March 24 was proclaimed in 2010 to be the International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims. First litigated in a case against Ecuador for failing to provide truth and justice for the family of a victim, the understanding of the right to truth has expanded over time as belonging not only to members of victims’ families, but to all members of society. While not a substitute for justice, truth is essential to ensuring lasting peace in conflict-affected communities.