Blog Posts in Human Rights

Posted by Enough Team on Apr 1, 2015

Yesterday, in an historic election, Nigeria had its first peaceful and democratic power transfer. This month, Africa will see another election, in President Omar al Bashir's Sudan. Unfortunately, there, elections don't necessarily mean choice. Given current restrictions on civil society organizations, some fear that if the elections proceed on April 13th, they will only intensify the conflict and worsen the humanitarian crisis in Sudan.

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 24, 2015
Credit: Holly Dranginis/Enough Project

In recognition of one of the newest universal human rights, March 24 was proclaimed in 2010 to be the International Day for the Right to the Truth concerning Gross Human Rights Violations and for the Dignity of Victims. First litigated in a case against Ecuador for failing to provide truth and justice for the family of a victim, the understanding of the right to truth has expanded over time as belonging not only to members of victims’ families, but to all members of society. While not a substitute for justice, truth is essential to ensuring lasting peace in conflict-affected communities.

Posted by Enough Team on Mar 19, 2015

Ohio University student and STAND Campaigns Coordinator Luke Kubacki reflects on his experience at the Lemkin Summit: A National Gathering of the Next Generation of Human Rights Defenders in February 2015.

Posted by Akshaya Kumar on Sep 15, 2014

Ten years ago this week, then-Secretary of State Colin Powell declared that genocide had been committed in Darfur and that the government of Sudan and the janjaweed bore responsibility for those acts. Even though it did not actually trigger a legal obligation to act, many hoped that using the "g word" meant that the United States was crossing the Rubicon and committing itself to stopping the violence in Darfur, Sudan's most troubled region. The janjaweed, however, are still at large in Darfur -- and with the Sudanese government's help, they are now arguably more powerful than ever.

Posted by Enough Team on Sep 9, 2014

South Sudan’s civil war began in December 2013 as a political power struggle, but quickly led to ethnic-targeted killings and revenge attacks. Thousands have been killed, although no one knows the exact number, and the country now faces what could become the most deadly famine in Africa since the 1990s. The Enough Project’s Justine Fleischner recently returned from a month-long trip to South Sudan and Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, where the regionally mediated peace process is underway. As part of Enough’s new interview series, Fleischner spoke with Greg Hittelman about what she saw.